1 or 2 Scoops of Protein Powder: How Much Is Right For You?

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You keep hearing that protein powder is a great way to help you meet your protein requirements for the day, but you’re not sure how many scoops you should be using.  

Generally, you should take 1 scoop of protein powder if you have a lower daily protein target and want to eat more whole foods to increase satiety, and 2 scoops if you have a higher daily protein target and are struggling to meet it.  But this can vary based on your goals, body weight, and how hard you’re working out.

Without the right protein supplementation strategy, you risk losing muscle instead of fat during a cut or gaining mostly fat instead of muscle during a bulk.

In this article, I’ll cover the details about scoops vs. servings of protein powder and how to determine how much protein you need based on your goals.

By the end, you’ll know whether 1 or 2 scoops of protein powder is better for you so you can ensure you get optimal results whether you’re trying to lose fat or gain muscle.

What Is Considered A “Scoop” of Protein?

A “scoop” of protein powder is based on the plastic scoop that is included inside bags and tubs of protein powder to help with measuring portions.  

Note, however, that scoop sizes can vary from brand to brand, and that one scoop may or may not be one serving.  Read the nutrition label carefully to see the recommended serving size, how many scoops are needed for that serving size, and how many grams of protein are in a serving.

For example, one scoop of Body Fortress Chocolate Whey Protein Powder weighs 50g and provides 200 calories with 30g of protein.

In comparison, one scoop of Quest Nutrition Chocolate Milkshake Protein Powder weighs 30g and provides 110 calories with 22g of protein.

You can see that the Body Fortress scoop is more than one and half times the size of the Quest Nutrition scoop, but it does not provide one and a half times the amount of protein, and the calories are nearly double.

Another concern is that the stated amount of protein powder per scoop may not match how much protein powder you actually get per scoop. 

I have personally experienced a scoop with a stated size of 25g, but when I measured out a level scoop of powder and weighed it, it was actually 35g.  This would mean that each scoop provides 40% more calories and protein than I thought, which could really add up.

For best accuracy, I recommend that you measure and weigh all foods, including protein powder, using a digital kitchen scale.

Determining How Much Protein You Need

A general guideline for athletes is to consume 1.2 – 2.2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight (0.5-1g of protein per pound of body weight) per day.

In general, I recommend 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight per day. For individuals looking to lose or gain weight, this can be based on goal body weight rather than starting body weight.

For example, a woman weighing 110lbs looking to gain muscle to get to 130lbs and a woman weighing 150lbs and looking to lose weight to get to 130lbs could both have a goal of 130g of protein per day.

These are excellent general guidelines that will work well for most individuals.  But you may need to tailor your approach based on the rest of your macro breakdown (i.e. how many carbs and fats you’re eating in addition to protein) when you’re bulking or cutting, and/or if your starting body fat percentage is quite high.

When Bulking

When bulking, a person is eating more calories than they burn (a calorie surplus). The body gets more than enough calories in total to meet its needs, and carbohydrates and fats provide lots of energy.  

This means that the body does not need to rely on dietary protein or breaking down muscle tissue in the body to meet its energy needs.  Protein intake can instead be prioritized for building new lean muscle tissue.

In this scenario, protein needs would be near the lower end of the recommended range of 0.5-1g of protein per pound of goal body weight per day.

A specialized bulking strategy would then be to consume only 0.7g of protein per pound of goal body weight per day instead of 1g of protein per pound of goal body weight per day.

For a woman weighing 110lbs looking to gain muscle to get to 130lbs, this would be 91g of protein (130 x 0.7) per day.

When Cutting

In order to lose body fat during a cutting phase, calorie intake must be lower than calorie expenditure (a calorie deficit). 

During a calorie deficit, the body will not be receiving enough energy to meet its needs from carbohydrates and fat.  It will also use dietary protein as a fuel source and will start breaking down muscle tissue along with fat tissue in the body to provide energy.

The goal when cutting is to preserve as much lean tissue as possible and to make as much of the weight loss as possible come from body fat.  In order to do this, protein intake needs to be high and coupled with a resistance training program to provide a stimulus to the body to continue making new muscle tissue. 

In this scenario, protein needs would be a little bit higher than the range of 0.5-1g of protein per pound of goal body weight per day.

A specialized cutting strategy would then be to consume 1.2g of protein per pound of goal body weight per day.  

For a woman weighing 150lbs looking to lose fat to get to 130lbs, this would be 156g of protein (130 x 1.2) per day.

Higher Body Fat

When a person has a higher body fat percentage (>25% for men or >33% for women), a larger portion of their total body weight comes from fat mass compared to lean body mass.  Protein is important for supporting lean body mass but not fat mass.

For example, a man weighing 200lbs with 25% body fat would have 50lbs of fat mass and 150lbs of lean body mass.

Instead of the general guideline of 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight (200g) per day, it would be more appropriate for him to focus on 1-1.2g of protein per pound of lean body mass, e.g. 150-180g of protein per day.

If you aren’t sure what your percentage of body fat is, here are a few ways to estimate, in order from most accurate (and generally most expensive) to less accurate:

If you would prefer not to do these measurements but suspect that your body fat is higher than 25% for men or 33% for women, I recommend 0.8g of protein per pound of current body weight.

Protein From Protein Powder

Once you know your recommended daily protein intake based on the guidelines above, you can consider how much of that requirement will be met using protein powder.  

I personally recommend that my clients aim to get no more than 20-33% (maximum one third) of their daily protein from protein powder.

I’ll discuss what this means in terms of the number of scoops next.

Who Should Take 1 Scoop of Protein?

Based on 20-33% of protein intake coming from protein powder, 1 scoop of protein powder providing ~25g of protein would be the maximum for anyone with a total daily protein target of 125g or less.

To ensure a good range of micronutrients, the remaining protein should come from whole food sources such as chicken or tilapiaWhole foods contain vitamins and minerals in naturally-occuring forms and ratios that work optimally for human health.

Plus, plant-based, protein-rich foods like black beans provide fiber and protein-rich beverages like milk can provide hydration.  These are both important for maintaining overall health.

The majority of your daily intake should come from whole food choices.

Who Should Take 2 Scoops of Protein?

Based on 20-33% of protein intake coming from protein powder, 2 scoops of protein powder providing ~50g of protein would be appropriate for individuals with a total daily protein target of 150-250g of protein.

This recommendation covers a large portion of the population.  For individuals with protein needs of 125-150g, 1.5 scoops is recommended.  

For individuals with protein needs greater than 250g per day, 3-4 scoops might be appropriate, especially if they are struggling to eat enough whole foods to meet this target without feeling uncomfortably full.  This can be a common concern while bulking.

Is 1 Scoop of Protein Better Than 2?

Whether 1 scoop or 2 scoops of protein powder is “better” really depends on the specific circumstances for each unique individual and their preferences and goals. 

1 Scoop

One scoop of protein powder can be better than 2 scoops for a person who is looking to lose weight.

They may find that chewing food can reduce energy intake and increase satiety, meaning that they feel fuller when they eat whole food protein versus drinking a protein shake.  

Feeling full and satisfied with meals is very important when it comes to successfully managing hunger and appetite during a calorie deficit for weight loss.

2 Scoops 

Two scoops of protein powder can be better than 1 scoop for a person who is looking to gain weight or is otherwise struggling to meet their protein targets from whole foods alone.  

Eating in a calorie surplus for muscle gain goals can be surprisingly challenging. Feeling uncomfortably full can make it hard for some people to eat enough for their needs, especially if they are very active and/or training intensely.

Two scoops of protein powder does not necessarily mean that the two scoops need to be taken together at the same time.  Two scoops could mean two separate protein shakes over the course of the day, with 1 scoop of protein in each.  This might mean one scoop of protein post-workout and one scoop of protein before bed.

Key Takeaway: One scoop of protein powder may be better for individuals looking to lose weight because it gives them room to meet their daily protein requirements by eating whole protein sources, which increases satiety. Two scoops of protein powder may be better for individuals looking to gain weight because they may have a harder time getting in all the protein they need from food sources alone.

Can Your Body Absorb 2 Scoops of Protein?

You may have heard that the amount of protein that can be absorbed in a single sitting is in some way limited, with an excess beyond that amount essentially “wasted.” 

However, the amount of protein that can be absorbed is virtually unlimited.  Your body can absorb 2 scoops of protein.

Eventually, ingested protein will be absorbed into and circulated throughout the body.

The difference is whether there are impacts on the use of protein in the body to promote muscle growth versus being broken down for energy or simply excreted in urine when a large amount of protein is consumed at one time.  Professional bodybuilder Jeff Nippard has a great video discussing these concerns.

In summary, the most important consideration is ensuring sufficient daily total protein intake.  Next, spreading that total intake fairly evenly over the meals for the day (ideally 3-5, but as little as 2 or as many as 6) is recommended.   

This study takes the recommendation even further, suggesting a maximum of 0.55g of protein per kg of body weight per meal (0.25g per pound of body weight per meal).

For a person weighing 150lbs (68kg), this would be a maximum of 37g of protein per meal (1.5 scoops of protein powder).  If this person had a daily protein target of 150g, this would mean 4 meals with 37g at each meal.

Should You Take More Than 2 Scoops of Protein Powder?

There are some limited circumstances in which more than 2 scoops of protein powder per day would be recommended.  For individuals with a total daily protein target greater than 250g, more than 2 scoops of protein powder might be needed to help with meeting protein targets for the day.  

However, even in that case, I do not recommend consuming more than 2 scoops of protein within a single meal or snack.

To learn even more about protein, please check out these other great articles on the site:

What’s Next?

The next thing you should learn about is what you should mix with your protein, as this can also impact your nutrition goals. I put together an article called What Can You Mix With Protein Powder, which outlines 13 examples. I’ll see you over there!


About The Author

Lauren Graham
LAUREN GRAHAM

Lauren Graham is a Precision Nutrition Level 1 certified nutrition coach. She focuses on helping busy professionals balance healthy eating and purposeful movement.  Lauren has a background in competitive swimming and is currently competing as a CrossFit athlete.  She has a passion for training, teaching, and writing.