Best Calorie & Macro Tracking App: I Tested 18 Apps

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I’ve spent the last two years testing almost every calorie and macro tracker on the market.  

All told, I’ve used 18 apps.  

I tested each app for a minimum of one month and used every feature available at the time of testing.  

I paid out of pocket for any features that weren’t free and didn’t receive any freebies from the companies.

For some of the more popular apps, I continued to use them well beyond the initial testing phase to see how they evolved over time.  

Throughout, I also consulted my colleagues at FeastGood.com, which consists of Registered Dietitians and Certified Nutrition Coaches. 

I’m also a nutrition coach, but the team’s input ensured I rated each app as honestly as possible.

Please know that this article is more of a high-level overview of my experiences.  

If you want to explore these apps further, I’ve included links to my detailed articles and videos, which cover everything you need to know before trying them. 

Of course, some people reading this will disagree with my assessments and where they are placed on this list, and that’s okay.  

For example, I might say I liked an app for a specific reason, and someone else might feel that the same thing I liked is exactly why they don’t use it.  

I’m happy to hear all types of comments and feedback or answer any questions you have.

Medical Disclaimer: The content of this article is provided for educational insights only. It should not be used as medical guidance. Individuals with a past of disordered eating should refrain from weight loss programs or calorie tracking. For medical advice, consult a certified healthcare professional. If you’re struggling with eating disorders, contact NEDA for assistance.

Criteria For Testing The Apps

I used the following criteria to evaluate each macro-tracking app:

  • Food Database: To evaluate each app’s food database, I considered whether it had a verified food database that users could trust, how many entries were user-created (more prone to error), the size of the food database, and the number of restaurant entries available (because many people love to eat out).
  • Tracking Capabilities: Each app’s tracking capabilities were evaluated based on the number of metrics the user can measure. These include nutritional information (calories, macronutrients, micronutrients), measures of progress (weight, body fat percentage, measurements, pictures), and health metrics (steps, blood pressure).
  • Calorie Recommendations: After inputting my data into each app and selecting a goal, I was given a calorie target to adhere to. I evaluated each calorie recommendation to determine whether the suggested target was reasonable or unrealistic.
  • Level of Customization: The level of customization was determined based on the number of features users can customize to tailor the app to their specific needs. Common customizations include altering calorie and macro targets, choosing your preferred rate of loss (how fast you want to lose weight), personalizing your dashboard (choosing which metrics to display), and adjusting weekly calorie distribution (how your calories are spread throughout the week: evenly or high/low calorie days).
  • Educational Opportunities: Although macro tracking apps aren’t explicitly designed for nutritional education, some apps provide more opportunities to learn about nutrition with built-in food ratings, biometric and habit tracking, and articles. Some apps even offer daily lessons. 
  • Coaching: Each macro tracking app was evaluated based on whether it offered built-in coaching services (human or algorithm). I assessed those with coaching based on the quality (human) and accuracy (algorithm) of the coaching.
  • Recipe Database: Many users prefer macro-tracking apps with a recipe database to provide meal inspiration. While using each app, I noted the ones that provided recipes, those that allowed users to create their own recipes, and those without recipe options.
  • Price: I also wanted to gauge the cost of each app ($-$$$$) and whether or not they had a free version available that had enough features to fulfill basic maco-tracking needs.

Ranked: Macro-Tracking App Analysis

1. MacroFactor: Best Overall

Overall Rating: 5/5

Features

  • Food Database: 5/5
  • Tracking Capabilities: 5/5
  • Calorie Recommendations: Very Accurate
  • Level of Customization: 5/5
  • Educational Opportunities: 4/5
  • Coaching: Built-In Coaching (algorithm)
  • Recipe Database: None, but users can create their own
  • Price: $$$

Highlights

  • Adherence-neutral philosophy
  • Fastest food logger on the market
  • Three different coaching styles (coached, collaborative, manual)
  • Advanced algorithm for more accurate recommendations

Drawbacks

  • No free version of the app
  • No desktop version

Enter code FEASTGOOD when signing up to get an extra week on your free trial (2 weeks total). 

My Thoughts

MacroFactor is the best macro-tracking app on the market – hands down. 

It has the most sophisticated coaching algorithm that is constantly gathering data and refining its recommendations to give users the most accurate targets. 

It’s also the only macro tracker on the market with an adherence-neutral approach.

The app’s adherence-neutral approach is my favorite feature because when I use the app, it doesn’t punish me for not hitting my targets perfectly. MacroFactor takes note of what I’m actually capable of and adjusts its targets over time to meet me where I’m at. 

Other nutrition apps I’ve used cut my calorie intake drastically if I cannot hit my targets. They do this in an attempt to keep me on track with my goal, but that’s not a sustainable approach and usually leads me (and my clients) to quit tracking altogether.

Another feature that makes MacroFactor stand out is its three different coaching options (coached, collaborative, and manual), which makes it beneficial for beginners and advanced macro-trackers.

Advanced people can use the manual option, which allows them to adjust their targets as needed without a weekly check-in. 

In contrast, beginners would benefit most from the coached option, which has weekly check-ins and automated adjustments to what they need to eat.  

As a nutrition coach, I was amazed at how accurate these adjustments were week-to-week. They are almost the exact same adjustments that I would make with clients if I was coaching them one-on-one.  

I was also impressed by how easy it was to log my food using its barcode scanner, manual entry, and “AI describe” (logging by dictation) options. The attention to detail the creators put into the food logging system is why MacroFactor has the fastest food logger on the market based on my testing.

I was excited about the app when it first launched back in 2021, and it has only improved with each update, specifically the launch of new progress tracking features (progress pictures, waist-to-hip ratio, etc.), micronutrient tracking, goal setting, and food database expansion.

The app has everything I need to reach my goals and is an app that I trust to give accurate recommendations to those who don’t have a strong background in nutrition (something I never thought I would say about a tracking app).

What makes this app so successful is the creators’ attention to detail in ensuring it is updated as new scientific evidence emerges and their willingness to consider user requests. 

You can see which features are in the works, which are being considered, and those that have been denied by checking out MacroFactor’s “roadmap.”

The normal free trial on MacroFactor is 7-days, but if you use the code FEASTGOOD you can get an extra week free (14 days total).

If you want to learn more about my detailed experience using MacroFactor, you can read this blog post

If you’re already thinking MacroFactor is something you’d like to try then make sure to watch this video where I walk you through the initial set up after downloading.  

2. Cronometer: Best Food Database

Overall Rating: 4.9/5

Features

  • Food Database: 5/5
  • Tracking Capabilities: 5/5
  • Calorie Recommendations: Accurate
  • Level of Customization: 5/5
  • Educational Opportunities: 4/5
  • Coaching: No built-in coaching, but can sync with a private coach
  • Recipe Database: None, but users can create their own
  • Price: $$

Highlights

  • Large verified food database
  • Extensive micronutrient tracking
  • In-depth biometric tracking for health conditions
  • Nutrition reports and charts for tracking progress

Drawbacks

  • Targets must be updated manually
  • Exercise calories are added back to your daily target by default

*This link gets you 10% off the gold plan. No code is required.

My Thoughts

I’m ranking Cronometer in second position, but it’s the one I use with all my nutrition clients, so you can trust that it’s also one of the top macro trackers on the market.

I use Cronometer with my nutrition clients because its “Pro Version” makes my job as a nutrition coach so much easier. It allows me to see my client’s food logs, monitor their progress, and change their targets as necessary.

It’s particularly helpful when working with clients with chronic conditions and those following a specific protocol requiring them to monitor certain nutrients because Cronometer tracks 82 micronutrients along with calories and macros.

I can also trust that the foods my clients are logging are accurate because Cronometer has the best food database of all the apps on the market. The entire food database is verified, meaning each entry comes from an accurate nutrition database, and it’s easy to choose your preferred measurement (grams, ounces, cups).

With some other apps (like MyFitnessPal), I’ve had to double-check each entry for inaccuracies, and my clients had to sort through fluff to find the food they’re looking for, which is a waste of time.

Cronometer also stands out because of its tracking capabilities. 

It lets me track body metrics (weight, measurements, body fat percentage, body temperature, and bowel movements), cardio metrics (blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen levels, and VO2 Max), lab metrics (blood glucose, hemoglobin, insulin, ketones, cholesterol), and mental metrics (energy, mood, and sleep).

Cronometer is the perfect app for data lovers like me who prefer a holistic approach rather than focusing on one or two measures. 

With all these tracking capabilities, I assumed that Cronometer would be confusing and “clunky,” but my clients and I agree that the app is easy to use and presents data using reports and graphs that are easy to comprehend.

The only downside to Cronometer and why it isn’t in the first place is that it really isn’t for beginners.  Cronometer doesn’t have a built-in algorithmic coaching feature, so the user (if not working with a nutrition coach) needs to update their targets manually in order to continue to see progress week to week.   

If Cronometer had a built-in coaching feature, it would likely be tied with MacroFactor for first place.

For anyone who is more advanced and self-sufficient with their nutrition, I’ve managed to work out a 10% discount on the pro plan, which is automatically applied when you use this link.  

Read my complete review of Cronometer here

3. Avatar Nutrition: Best Recipe Database

Overall Rating: 4.6/5

Features

  • Food Database: 3/5 
  • Tracking Capabilities: 5/5
  • Calorie Recommendations: Accurate
  • Level of Customization: 5/5
  • Educational Opportunities: 4/5
  • Coaching:  Built-in coaching (algorithm & human)
  • Recipe Database: Yes
  • Price: $$$

Highlights

  • Built-in coaching via algorithm
  • Opportunity to chat with a live coach
  • Impressive recipe database

Drawbacks

  • Unverified food database
  • No free version of the app

My Thoughts

I started using the Avatar App when it launched in 2015. It was my first exposure to a macro-tracking app with a built-in diet coach. Since then, the app has undergone many updates that increased the level of customization and improved user experience.

Avatar has built-in coaching, which consists of weekly check-ins and target adjustments. As a nutrition coach, I know how important it is to check in with clients to keep them motivated and ensure they’re heading in the right direction, so I appreciate that Avatar goes beyond providing initial recommendations.

I also love that it has a “vacation mode” setting that I can select when I’m taking a break from tracking so that the app doesn’t expect me to check in.

However, I need to point out one significant difference between MacroFactor’s and Avatar’s built-in coaching.

Avatar does not change the user’s targets unless they are adherent. This isn’t necessarily a negative thing because, as a coach, I want my clients to be able to hit their targets and see how their bodies respond before making changes. 

However, we must consider that the user may never be able to hit the targets consistently and, therefore, never get their targets adjusted, leaving them feeling frustrated and spinning their wheels.

In contrast, MacroFactor’s approach is to make changes based on what the user is actually capable of. If a client cannot hit the targets set, it will adjust by considering what they can achieve.

There is one thing that Avatar does better than MacroFactor, and that is providing users with incredible macro-friendly recipes. You can check out some of the delicious recipes available in the app by visiting the Avatar Nutrition Blog.

As someone who is immersed in the nutrition world, I’m always looking for new macro-friendly recipes for me and my clients, and I have to say that Avatar’s recipe database is the best I’ve seen thus far for lower-calorie, higher-protein options (like this “Buffalo Chicken Pasta Bake”).

If you’re in the market for a built-in coach that provides recipe inspiration, Avatar is a solid contender.

Read my complete review of Avatar here

4. Carbon Diet Coach: Best Macro Tracker For Reverse Dieting

Overall Rating: 4.3/5

Features

  • Food Database: 4/5
  • Tracking Capabilities: 4/5
  • Calorie Recommendations: Accurate
  • Level of Customization: 3/5
  • Educational Opportunities: 3/5
  • Coaching: Built-in coaching (algorithm)
  • Recipe Database: None, but users can create their own
  • Price: $$$

Highlights

  • Built-in coaching with weekly check-ins
  • Straightforward and easy to use
  • Ability to select reverse dieting as a goal

Drawbacks

  • Unverified Food Database
  • No free version of the app

My Thoughts

Carbon Diet Coach is highly similar to the Avatar app, which makes sense, considering Layne Norton was a co-founder of Avatar and the founder of Carbon (it’s a long story why he left Avatar and started a competing app, which is not worth going into in this article).  

Carbon Diet Coach also takes a black-and-white approach to calorie and macro adjustments, requiring users to adhere to their targets before adjusting during the weekly check-in period. While this isn’t necessarily bad, MacroFactor is more intuitive and works with the user rather than against them.

All that to say, Carbon Diet Coach has a great built-in coaching algorithm with weekly check-ins and accurate calorie and macro adjustments, but it’s not on the same level as MacroFactor.

I was impressed with Carbon’s food database because it seemed to have all the food I searched for or scanned (using the barcode scanner), and each entry comes from a verified food database, so I could trust the entries to be accurate.

Logging food and manipulating the measurements couldn’t have been easier. The food logger is very streamlined and reminded me of MacroFactor’s food logger but with fewer bells and whistles (aka AI Describe).

I also liked how easy it was to customize my intake to suit my preferences. I used the “calorie planner” to increase my calorie intake on intense workout days to fuel my training sessions and decrease my calories on rest days to keep me on track with my goal. 

I see this feature being popular for those athletes like me who want to periodize their nutrition based on their training and for situations where I eat more than planned on one day and want to compensate for it the next day to stay on target.

I honestly can’t say anything bad about the app because it does exactly what it was designed to do. It’s easy to use with zero fluff, which is precisely what some people want.

I ranked it lower than Avatar because I appreciate that Avatar has a recipe database and the ability to talk to a live coach, but others who don’t care about those additional features may rank them differently.

Read my complete review of Carbon Diet Coach here

5. MyMacros+: Most Cost-Effective App For Built-In Coaching

Overall Rating: 4.0/5

Features

  • Food Database: 3/5
  • Tracking Capabilities: 3/5
  • Calorie Recommendations: Accurate
  • Level of Customization: 3/5
  • Educational Opportunities: 3/5
  • Coaching: Built-in coaching (algorithm)
  • Recipe Database: None, but users can create their own
  • Price: $

Highlights

  • Built-in “macro coach” offering weekly check-ins & adjustments
  • Very affordable

Drawbacks

  • The food database is disappointing
  • No free version of the app

My Thoughts

MyMacros+ is similar to MyNetDiary (ranked #6), but as its name suggests, it prioritizes macros over calories, which I prefer because I care more about monitoring my macronutrient intake than my calorie intake. Meeting my macro targets will ensure I look and feel how I want and will add up to my desired calorie target anyway.

This app followed through on its promise of a “macro coach,” involving weekly check-ins that adjusted my targets as necessary to keep me on track with my goal. I was pleasantly surprised that the recommended macro targets (and associated calorie target) were accurate because, often, cheaper apps are less accurate.

What disappointed me most about MyMacros+ was its food database, which I expected because many users complained about the inaccuracy of the entries and the lack of diversity. The food database did not contain many of my everyday foods despite having a barcode scanner, which was annoying because the other apps I tested had most (if not all) of my go-to foods.

However, the foods the database contained were accurate, and I found it easy to change the measurement of the foods I was logging, so there were some positive aspects regarding the food database.

Based on my experience, I’d say that MyMacros+ is a good fit for those who want a budget-friendly tracker with a built-in coaching feature and are willing to create their own foods in the database rather than relying on pre-existing data.

Read my complete review of MyMacros+ here.

6. MyNetDiary: Most Cost-Effective Tracker (Without Coaching)

Overall Rating: 3.9/5

Features

  • Food Database: 4/5
  • Tracking Capabilities: 3/5
  • Calorie Recommendations: Somewhat Accurate
  • Level of Customization: 3/5
  • Educational Opportunities: 4/5
  • Coaching: Virtual coach
  • Recipe Database: Yes
  • Price: $

Highlights

  • Access to meal plans and recipes
  • Community access to communicate with other users
  • Free version available

Drawbacks

  • The virtual coach does not serve as a built-in coach
  • Macro targets are not easily accessible

My Thoughts

One of my favorite things about MyNetDiary is that each food entry has a rating (A-D) based on quality. This feature helps to educate users on the value of food beyond its calorie content, which is often overlooked.

The app is also straightforward, provides access to a community that offers support and encouragement, and provides recipe and meal plan inspiration that I think is valuable.

My main complaints about MyNetDiary are that the calorie recommendations are inaccurate, the macronutrient targets are not readily displayed (making them feel like an afterthought), and the virtual coaching feature is misleading.

MyNetDiary’s calorie recommendations are not as accurate as possible because they do not factor activity level into their equation. The equation they use may be suitable for someone who does not work out, but those who are active will find the recommendations inaccurate.

For example, the app recommended that I aim for 1500 calories to lose 1lb/week, but I maintain my weight by eating 2300 calories daily. So, if I were to eat 1500 calories, I would actually be on track to lose 1.6 lbs/week.

I appreciated that users could adjust their targets manually to make them more accurate. Still, as a nutrition coach, I know that most people need more knowledge to do this independently.

Another thing that disappoints me is that the virtual coaching feature is essentially just a tool to recommend recipes and meal plans rather than an algorithm with weekly check-ins like the other apps I’ve ranked thus far. 

Although I wish I could change things about the app, MyNetDairy is dirt cheap, so it has a lot to offer, considering it’s so inexpensive. With that in mind, I think this is the perfect macro-tracking for those looking to spend as little as possible.

Read my complete review of MyNetDiary here.

7. Lifesum: Best For General Health

Overall Rating: 3/5

Features

  • Food Database: 4/5
  • Tracking Capabilities: 3/5
  • Calorie Recommendations: Inaccurate
  • Level of Customization: 3/5
  • Educational Opportunities: 4/5
  • Coaching: None
  • Recipe Database: Yes
  • Price: $$

Highlights

  • Access to recipes and meal plans
  • Ability to track specific habits

Drawbacks

  • Inaccurate calorie recommendations
  • It is not worth using unless you upgrade to the premium version

*This link gets you 50% off the annual plan. No code is required.

My Thoughts

As a nutrition coach, I love the emphasis Lifesum places on health. Its incorporation of habit tracking, healthy recipes, food ratings, and its “Health Test” feature are valuable for sustainable lifestyle changes.

The health test was a series of 40 questions that asked about my current lifestyle habits to see where I was performing well and where I could improve. I enjoyed this feature because it served as a “lifestyle reality check.” However, I wish the app had done more with this information rather than just giving me a score.

I ranked Lifesum so low on this list because the app’s calorie recommendations are inaccurate, which also causes the macro recommendations to be flawed. 

When I looked into the equation that Lifesum uses to calculate their calorie recommendations, I noticed that it doesn’t factor in activity level (similar to MyNetDiary), so those who are active will have inaccurate targets.

I don’t mind adjusting my own targets, using the food database, and taking advantage of the other features this app offers, but I understand that others may not feel that way if they don’t have a strong enough background in nutrition.

Another reason I ranked Lifesum lower on the list is because I don’t feel like the meal plan feature was well executed. Most of the meal plans are centered around fad diets (i.e., keto, fasting, etc) and are not personalized to the user. 

I like the idea of apps providing meal plans because sometimes I don’t want to think about what to eat, and having something to follow makes it easier to plan meals. However, Lifesum’s meal plans are restrictive and encourage users to cut out entire food groups, which concerns me because I don’t want users to think they have to eat that way to lose weight.

Lifesum would be ideal for those knowledgeable enough to set their own macro targets (or those working with a nutrition coach) and who want to take advantage of the recipe database and habit-tracking features.

Read my complete review of Lifesum here.

8. Noom: Best For Long-Term Lifestyle Changes

Overall Rating: 3/5

Features

  • Food Database: 3/5
  • Tracking Capabilities: 2/5
  • Calorie Recommendations: Somewhat Accurate
  • Level of Customization: 1/5
  • Educational Opportunities: 5/5
  • Coaching: Built-in coaching (human)
  • Recipe Database: Yes
  • Price: $$$$

Highlights

  • Daily psychology lessons
  • Emphasis on nutritional education
  • Calorie range that encourages more flexibility
  • Access to a coach for support

Drawbacks

  • It does not track macronutrients
  • It has minimal customization options
  • Most expensive app on the market

My Thoughts

Noom is one of the best nutrition apps on the market because of its emphasis on behavioral psychology, but I can’t say that it’s the best food-tracking app out there because it doesn’t track macros. 

I was disappointed that Noom focused on calorie intake and completely ignored macronutrient intake. I was also disappointed that it didn’t include education surrounding macronutrients in its lessons, so users may not know they can be in the proper calorie range and still feel unhealthy.

One aspect of the calorie tracking that I really liked was that it uses a calorie range rather than a specific target. The benefit of having a range is that I didn’t feel the need to be perfect, which made me feel like I was still on track even on lower and higher calorie days. 

The only downside to this was that the calorie range was too broad, so if I were at the lower end, I would be severely under-eating, and at the higher end, I wouldn’t be in a calorie deficit. It would be more successful if Noom could refine the calorie range recommendations.

One of the features that Noom uses to educate users about the calorie content of food is a color classification system of green, yellow, and red foods. Green foods are the lowest calorie foods, which Noom encouraged me to eat more of, and red foods are the highest calorie foods and are recommended in lower quantities.

I like that this classification system teaches users about the caloric value of foods because often, people think that just because a food is healthy means it’s low in calories, which isn’t the case with foods like avocados.

The only potential issue with this classification system is that users might think red foods are bad, but hopefully, the daily psychology lessons help discourage this train of thought.

The psychology lessons were everything I hoped they would be, so I would recommend Noom to anyone who wants to lose weight, improve their lifestyle, and repair their relationship with food.

If Noom had the same tracking capabilities as MacroFactor, it would be the ultimate macro-tracking app.

As it stands, Noom is the most expensive nutrition app on the market, so users may not want to invest in Noom, knowing that it can’t track macros.

That said, this app is incredibly valuable for those who have struggled to reach their goals or maintain their progress long-term. The psychology lessons that Noom provides can help users understand where they may have gone wrong in past dieting attempts and how to move forward with a more sustainable approach.

Read my complete review of Noom here.

9. MyFitnessPal: Best For International Food Logging

Overall Rating: 2/5

Features

  • Food Database: 3/5
  • Tracking Capabilities: 3/5
  • Calorie Recommendations: Inaccurate
  • Level of Customization: 2/5
  • Educational Opportunities: 1/5
  • Coaching: None
  • Recipe Database: Yes
  • Price: $$$

Highlights

  • There are many international foods and restaurant entries to choose from
  • Free version available

Drawbacks

  • There are too many inaccurate food entries
  • Limited micronutrient tracking
  • Too many glitches

My Thoughts

MyFitnessPal was the first macro-tracking app I ever used, and at the time, I was impressed by how easy it was to log my intake and work towards a weight loss goal. Having tried it recently, I was disappointed in how it has evolved over time.

The main issue I have with MyFitnessPal is that its food database is too cluttered with inaccurate entries; I wasted time looking for the food items I wanted and for entries that had the measurement option that I wanted (i.e., grams). 

I also found its calorie recommendations inaccurate, suggesting I eat much less than necessary to lose weight. This also caused the macronutrient targets to be flawed. I decided to set my own calorie and macro targets rather than follow the recommended calorie target.

I also learned that MyFitnessPal added calories burned through exercise back into my daily calorie goal (until I turned it off). I overlooked this default setting until after the first week of tracking. If I hadn’t noticed the calories being added back in, losing weight over time would have been more challenging, so users should be aware that this occurs.

When I consider the price of the premium version of MyFitnessPal (which unlocks the barcode scanner and the ability to customize targets) compared to other macro-tracking apps in this list, it’s priced too high. 

To put this in perspective, MacroFactor (which has built-in coaching) costs $11.99/month, and MyFitnessPal costs $19.99/month.

For these reasons, I can’t justify ranking MyFitnessPal any higher on this list. This macro-tracker made my top nine because it is the best app for logging international foods and restaurant meals. 

These entries may make it worth choosing for those who struggle to log their intake using other apps with less inclusive food databases.

Read my complete review of MyFitnessPal here.

Why Trust My Recommendation?

I’ve worked in the health and fitness industry for the past seven years in gyms and clinical settings, helping clients achieve their goals. As a strength and nutrition coach, I use macro-tracking apps every day to help me achieve my personal goals and coach my clients so I know what features are most valuable. 

Macro Tracking Testing Methodology Explained

I tested 18 macro-tracking apps by using each one for a month. I created an account to evaluate each app, input my biometrics (height, weight, etc.), received calorie and macro targets, and logged my daily food intake.

I followed the recommended adjustments for apps with built-in coaching to see if my body responded as predicted. For apps without a built-in coaching function, I adjusted my targets manually to keep me on track with my goal.

About The Author

Amanda Parker

Amanda Parker is an author, nutrition coach, and Certified Naturopath.  She works with bodybuilders, Olympic weightlifters, and powerlifters to increase performance through nutrition and lifestyle coaching.

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